Annie Segarra


Annie Segarra

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Annie Segarra and I am a YouTuber (Annie Elainey), content creator, actress/singer, speaker, and activist. My content is typically about my experiences and observations as a disabled (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and comorbid conditions and disabilities) and queer woman of color and how these aspects of my identity intersect and affect the way I navigate the world.

What hardware do you use?

I use an EZ Lite Cruiser to get around and an ergonomic foldable-cane by CareX for activities requiring me to stand/walk for less than 1-2 minutes (my average limit), unless I have an injury and/or pain or I am having dysautonomia symptoms/flares, in which case, I am completely unable to stand up. For the hypermobility in my fingers, I use a full set of ring splints and for air-born allergies, I use a Vogmask. I use Ace knee, ankle, and wrist braces as they are my most vulnerable parts, and try several things in attempts for pain relief including muscle creams, acupuncture mats, heated blankets, compression, and other tools.

My laptop is a 2012 Asus with Windows 7 and my phone is currently a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 which I may be updating soon! Because of chronic pain and chronic fatigue and dysautonomia symptoms, I'm often in bed and use the first version of AdapDesk (the updated version available for pre-order) to work in bed.

For filming, I use a Nikon COOLPIX P7700 and recently started using a Canon G7 X Mark II, and for recording vocals I either use the mic in my phone or the Yeti mic.

And what software?

For video editing, I use Adobe Premiere Pro and to create my thumbnails I often use an app called PhotoLayers on my phone, which allows me to cut out backgrounds and layer images, and it's a FREE app! So there's a hack for fellow broke creators! For journaling, note-taking, and other writing I use Google Docs on Google Drive, Evernote, and Grammarly. For recording music and attempting some sound editing I use the free software Audacity.

What would be your dream setup?

Maybe the AltWork Station where I'd be able to recline and sit up as my back and blood vessels need but maintaining support no matter my position. I'm pretty happy with my current power chair, though a flying chair would be cool! Haha! Realistically, maybe a hands-free (of the ones available I'd get a blue one) or more modern looking chair. And I'd LOVE a cool looking accessible vehicle like the Kia Sorento by Freedom Motors!


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Lake Sharp


Lake Sharp

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Lake Sharp. I'm the owner of two business. I'm co-founder & marketing director of EVERYBODY, a radically inclusive gym and wellness center in LA and the owner/sole operator of ARRAY, a design service that focuses primarily on native landscaping, interior design, ceramic works and occasional textile/garment works. I'm also a mom to one toddler, which has really helped shape what I do. Motherhood has given me a lot of clarity about my priorities, how I want to spend my time when I'm not with her and how I want to model "work" for her.

What hardware do you use?

Hardware is my jam! For both businesses I rely heavily on my iPhone and new MacBook Pro, which is whatever, but I'm more into my tools! I love tools. In my design work I rely heavily on them. I love my Ryobi drill, and I have many well worn spades, rakes, and trowels. I own two wheelbarrows and I'm especially fond of my mattock. It would take me FOREVER to name all of my ceramic hardware, but I love my Pacifica wheel and my Bailey slab roller and my two used Cress Kilns. I gifted myself to brand new Viking straight stitch and serger sewing machines last year – good old workhorse sewing machines are great, but a brand new quality sewing machine is a dream.

And what software?

For the gym, we use MINDBODY, which has a corner on the market. It's not the best, but it is ubiquitous. I hand draw all of my landscape designs. I muscle through Pages to make invoices, client inspo boards and all other work-related paperwork.

What would be your dream setup?

Oooo, I'm very close to my dream set up. I just need a compostable toilet out by my home studio. The nice ones are surprisingly expensive, but I'd like to build a cute little outhouse back there. I'd love to have a really cool gardening tool storage set up, which seems totally possible, I just need to do it!

Right now, we have a little Airbnb in our basement apartment. Once we can afford it, I'd like to take over the space and move my home office down there. That way I'll have room for an industrial straight stitch and serger and be able to have a full studio set up instead of having to take stuff in and out of storage. I'm so close though, which is radical.


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John Karel


John Karel

Who are you, and what do you do?

I'm John Karel. I'm primarily a computer animator. I make GIFs and animated videos for a living, working as a freelancer.

What hardware do you use?

My main computer is a Late 2013 iMac. I alternate between an Apple Bluetooth keyboard and a Logitech wireless solar keyboard for when i need a number pad. My mouse is the Logitech MX Master, which if it broke today I would buy a new one tomorrow. I also have a Microsoft Surface Pro 4, which I use mainly to draw on. My phone is an iPhone 6s.

I used an art supply store gift certificate to buy a bunch of Copic Markers last year but have hardly used them… have been really meaning to make some drawings with them though.

And what software?

For 3D modeling and animation I use Autodesk Maya and Blender (separately, not both on one project). For video editing I use Apple's program Motion and Adobe Premiere. For drawing I use Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. My goal is to drop both Maya and Motion from my workflow though and only use Blender and the Adobe suite in the future.

What would be your dream setup?

My dream set-up would be a large room with large windows. A dual monitor set-up with a computer more substantial than an iMac. Surrounded by houseplants and a water cooler.


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Jeremy Wortsman


Jeremy Wortsman

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Jeremy Wortsman and I am the founder and managing director of The Jacky Winter Group, a creative representation and production agency with offices in Melbourne and New York City. Our artists complete thousands of commissions a year for some of the world's leading brands and businesses and we just celebrated our ten-year anniversary!

I also manage Lamington Drive, our bricks-and-mortar gallery space, and most recently, our luxury guesthouse and artist residency, Jacky Winter Gardens in the Dandenong Ranges. I am also the host of the Melbourne chapter of CreativeMornings and a founding member of The Contemplary.

In a previous life, I was the co-founder of the design practice, Chase & Galley, as well as one of the founding publishers and designers of Is Not Magazine. There are some other things that I'm sure I'm forgetting, but reading the question all I can think of is those Arnold Schwarzenegger prank calls so I got distracted.

What hardware do you use?

My 2017 15" MacBook Pro drives pretty much everything along with my trusty iPhone 7+. When seated at my workstation, I'm running a 29" LG Ultra Widescreen Monitor. Bose QC30's are my sanity maker, and are probably in my ears at least half the day. I use an Anker Vertical Mouse and Apple wireless keyboard. All our workstations are also fitted with 12 South Fermata headphone stands and HiRise 2 stands, as we use our mobiles for all telecommunications via Bria. We use Synology units for local file access, with their great cloud sync feature so we can keep portfolios updated via Dropbox. All our desks are standing desks – some of them manual WorkFit-D units from Ergotron, and some electronic ones from IKEA – all with custom tops. We also have a treadmill desk (of course) from Lifespan, which we love.

In our Collingwood office we also run a pretty robust production space, including a dedicated VR room running a HTC Vive off an Alienware 15. That room adjoins our printing operation, New Blank Document, which runs a 44" Epson Stylus Pro 9900, a Graphtec FC8600 plotter and cutter, plus an Riso A2 machine – the only one of its kind in Australia. We also run Ring products for our doorbell and entryway, which have been total lifesavers, except when we actually got burgled when we had to recharge one. Whoops!

Our podcast setup is also key, where we run a Focusrite 18i8, and three Shure BETA 87a's all running from an iMac.

We also just started a digital life drawing event in our gallery called Looking Glass, which provides all participants with 12.9" iPad Pros, along with Apple Pencils, which we also use for our in-agency marketing meetings.

I like hardware.

And what software?

Google Apps, Slack, Dropbox, Adobe Creative Cloud, 1Password and Xero run all the day to day stuff, nothing new there. Basecamp runs most of our projects, and it's all hooked up to a custom Filemaker Pro setup which we have been delicately maintaining and developing like a bonsai for the last ten years. We also have a suite of custom-made web apps that we use – some built into our WordPress setup, some totally bespoke. It's all held together with various APIs and plugins so that everything talks to each other, which is really nifty.

Our podcast is recorded with Zencastr, which is amazing for connecting our New York and Melbourne Offices, using Zoom for video meetings. We use Envoy at our reception desk to announce visitors and handle couriers.

Wunderlist is our to-do manager for everything internal. It's so fast and just works. We manage our internal wiki and documentation in Evernote. We're also joining the cult of Airtable and Dropbox Paper to phase out some Google products. Sonos handles all our music, with Spotify for the shared playlists (Like Slate's Summer Strut!) and discovery, with Apple Music for an actual library. Overcast on iOS for podcasts, where I listen to everything at 2x.

Droplr is indispensable for screenshots and markup. I also couldn't live without Keyboard Maestro for recording macros, and TextExpander as well. The Great Suspender is the one Chrome plugin that has also been the best thing I have ever run to improve laptop performance and speed, and I cannot recommend it highly enough, along with the Gboard iOS keyboard for swipe input.

I live and die by my RSS feeds via Newsblur.

Reading through all this, I realise I haven't even scratched the surface of all the actual hardware and software we use on a daily basis, and I think I may have an actual problem.

Of course, this is why I endorse the Insight Timer app for 2x 30 minute meditation sessions per day, so I can try to forget about said hardware and software.

What would be your dream setup?

Honestly, I think it's pretty close to actually being achieved! Typing is a bit of a bummer sometimes. Something that would allow me to type my thoughts would be awesome, but in the meantime voice recognition will have to do, so I'm really excited for it to actually work properly someday. 32GB of RAM in an Apple laptop wouldn't be too much to ask either, maybe? One can dream…


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Roxane Gay


Roxane Gay

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Roxane Gay with one n. I am a writer and an associate professor at Purdue.

What hardware do you use?

I use several different machines because I live in two places and travel several times a month. I travel with a tiny pink Macbook. It is so cute and dainty and looks ridiculous in my hands because I am cute but not dainty. At home in Indiana I use an iMac and a MacBook Air. In Los Angeles I use a MacBook Pro I hate. It's the new one with the Touch ID and it's just designed all wrong. MY FINGER CONSTANTLY HITS THE ESCAPE BUTTON AND OMG I'm mad just thinking about it.

I also use an iPhone and iPad as needed which is to say constantly. I'm not allowed to get an Apple Watch but if I were I am really ashamed to say I would get one even though I don't like watches or wearing things around my wrist.

I listen to music on Sonos speakers. I have conversations with my Amazon Echos in both homes. Sometimes, my niece has shockingly long, in depth conversations with Alexa. Straight up, there is no better person to talk to a curious, chatty five year old than Alexa. It's so delightful to watch. Also, it took only two visits for my niece to figure out how to talk to Alexa. The first time, she would shout, "Alexa," but then wait an excruciating minute to say something else, by which time Alexa had moved on to other things. The next visit, she was ready for Alexa, had her requests and jokes ready. She asks Alexa to play Ariana Grande and music from Frozen, A LOT. She never runs out of questions for Alexa and Alexa never runs out of patience. Hell takes on different forms for us all.

I watch TV on Samsung TVs that are garishly large with accompanying sound bars. I use an HP laser printer that is no longer made but it is perfect. I think it is the M400 or something. I hope it never breaks because if it does, I just don't know what I will do.

And what software?

I use Google Suite, Google Keep, Microsoft Word, Final Draft, Chrome, Adobe Creative Suite, and a bunch of apps on my phone to make it appear as if I am on top of everything when I am not — respective banking apps, apps for American, Delta, United, and Alaska Airlines, Kayak, TripAdvisor, Carey, Uber, blah blah blah. Also Scrabble and Words With Friends, Candy Crush Saga, Pokémon GO, Snapchat, Twitter, and Dropbox. I have a bunch of other apps on my phone but I generally use them once and then never open them again.

What would be your dream setup?

I pretty much have my dream set up but if I were to get really outrageous with my dreams, I would spend less time staring at screens and simply have an ocular implant and be able to think my thoughts into the cloud and write and do research and waste time that way. At the very least, I want to be able to project things from my laptop onto the wall so I can see what emojis I am working with. They are so fucking tiny on the phone. I feel we're fewer than 33 years away from this technological nirvana. Fingers crossed.


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Ian MacLarty


Ian MacLarty

Who are you, and what do you do?

I'm an independent game designer, artist and programmer from Melbourne. I make a lot of small experimental games often with a visual focus. You can find my portfolio here: http://ianmaclarty.com. I'm currently working on an abstract puzzle game.

What hardware do you use?

I mainly use a MacBook Pro (2017, 13", no touch bar). I don't use any external keyboards, mice or monitors. I dislike having to plug and unplug things and I like working in the kitchen where there's plenty of natural light. I also have an older desktop (Intel i5 CPU, 8GB RAM, GTX660 GPU, 1TB mechanical HDD, 23" monitor) with Linux and Windows 7 that I use less often, mainly for testing or playing games.

I have an iPhone 6 that I use for testing and sometimes for music production. I also have an older iPad and some older iPhones and a cheap Android phone that I use exclusively for testing. I have a pair of KRK KNS-8400 headphones and a Behringer C-1U microphone for audio work.

And what software?

I mostly work in the terminal and use vim as my editor. I use the standard Terminal app on Mac and whatever the default terminal on Linux Mint is. On Windows I use MSYS and rxvt. I often write bash or node.js scripts to automate repetitive tasks.

I use my own game engine called Amulet which is written in C++ and uses GNU make as its build system. I use the Clang, GCC and Visual C++ compilers. I've found Valgrind very useful for tracking down memory errors and leaks. I rarely use a debugger, preferring print statements (this is somewhat ironic, because I did my postgraduate research on debuggers). I write my games in Lua and use LuaJIT on desktop and vanilla Lua on mobile and browser.

For 2D graphics I'm currently using Acorn, but will sometimes use GIMP when I'm working on Linux. For audio I use Audacity on Mac and Linux and on my iPhone I've used Figure to produce music and Animoog to produce sound effects. I've also used SFXR.

I occasionally use Blender for 3D modelling or trailer production. Sometimes I'll also use iMovie for trailers, though it doesn't give as much control as Blender. I use GIF Brewery 3 and QuickTime to record GIFs and gameplay footage respectively and Handbrake to transcode between video formats.

What would be your dream setup?

I'm pretty happy with what I've got. I'd like to get more into music production so if I could afford it I'd purchase Ableton Live and maybe get one of those fancy Ableton Push devices.


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Jenny Jiao Hsia


Jenny Jiao Hsia

Who are you, and what do you do?

Hi, my name is Jenny Jiao Hsia and I'm an independent game developer based in Brooklyn, NY. In 2014, I collaborated with AP Thomson on a small game about smooching and loneliness in space. The following year, we worked together again and released a game about computers, magic, and insecurity.

Some of my solo projects include games about doing your makeup in 10 seconds or less, putting a noodle-limbed through a serious yoga workout, and feeding your hungry buddy on a date!

When I'm not making games, I like prototyping with microcontrollers and sewing plush dolls called Bedtime Buddies.

What hardware do you use?

I use a 13-inch MacBook Pro (early 2015) to make my games. My computer isn't equipped with a lot of storage space, so I keep my files on a portable external hard drive. For drawing, I use a small Wacom tablet and this mouse — it's cheap, but reliable… and I really like how it fits in my hand.

I always carry a notebook with me so I can jot down ideas and designs wherever I go. I really like how the pages are dotted instead of gridded. It provides enough of a guide to draw in straight lines, but doesn't constrain me too much if I want to scribble freely. I using pens instead of pencils, and this one is my favorite to write with!

For non-digital crafting, I've been using this small sewing machine from Janome. It doesn't come with a lot of fancy buttons or options, but this basic model gets the job done for me. I like the color and size a lot, but I wish it could handle thicker fabrics. Sometimes it even chugs a bit. If you're a beginner to sewing and you're looking for something fun to play around with — I would recommend it. However you might want to make an investment and upgrade to something sturdier if you're looking for a machine for long-term use.

I find a lot of my textiles from the thrift store — I'd recommend checking out the curtains and blankets because you get a lot of quality fabric for a really low price. Just throw them in the wash before cutting and sewing with them! I pick up my other materials (like embroidery thread, buttons, ribbon, beads, key rings, etc.) at Flying Tiger and Michael's. It's fun to browse those stores because you can find really neat materials that will add a lot of character.

I've been using a Makey Makey to prototype the hardware portion of my controllers and I create the final version with a FLORA microcontroller and conductive thread. I'd recommend checking Tinkersphere and Adafruit if you're looking for more sewable electronic parts.

I take photos using an iPhone 6S and my workspace consists of a small IKEA table and one of those heavy-duty folding chairs from Costco.

And what software?

I use Unity to make games and Bitbucket for source control. For art, I make 2D assets in Photoshop and 3D models in Maya. I edit sound effects in Audition and I record gameplay footage with QuickTime Player and Soundflower. Sometimes I use LICEcap to capture gifs — the framerate can end up looking sort of choppy and slow, so I will occasionally resort to Photoshop to create better quality gifs. I use Google Drive on a regular basis, and recently I've been experimenting with the Arduino IDE. My favorite app to edit photos with on my phone is VSCO and I like doodling on these pictures with Facebook's Messenger app.

What would be your dream setup?

My dream setup would include a big sturdy desk, a nice comfy chair, an enormous bulletin board, a more serious and robust sewing machine, a powerful Mac Pro with tons of storage, and a couple of extra monitors!


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Jillian C. York


Jillian C. York

Who are you, and what do you do?

Hi! I'm Jillian C. York, and I'm a writer and activist whose work explores the impact of surveillance and censorship on marginalized communities. Most of that work is with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and my main project there, Onlinecensorship.org, and I also do quite a bit of writing and public speaking.

I've been based in Berlin for the past three years, and I don't think I'll ever love a city more than this one. You can be whomever or whatever you want in Berlin. I love my communities here, and the fact that I can carry a beer wherever I want, and the fact that the city is really pretty diverse when you delve into it.

What hardware do you use?

I just got a souped-up, gently-used 13" MacBook Pro Retina from 2015 and I love it. The screen is amazing, such an upgrade from the ca. 2012 13" Air that I'd been using. The speakers are also decent, which is important to me – I spend a lot of time traveling and a lot of time listening to music… and I don't have the space to carry a speaker.

My phone is a 1-year-old iPhone SE (rose gold); I switched over after years of using Androids. My last two were Sony Xperia Z1s, and I loved them for their ability to take strange night photos, but the screens stop working if you crack them, and I'm clumsy. I really like small phones, though, and wish more designers thought about people like me who have small hands!

At work, I do my listening on a pair of aged Harmon Kardon SoundSticks with a USB-only connection. I love them, and I wish more things were so oddly crafted. I use Apple's standard earbuds, ever since Phillips discontinued my favorite in-ear headphones. Ideally, I'd use over-ear noise-cancelling headphones, but my sometimes-angry ear piercings won't let me.

I'm also a really big fan of paper. My partner and I are both really into Post-Its, which you can find all over my walls, inside my notebooks, and on pretty much every inappropriate surface you could imagine. My notebook is a Leuchtturm1917 – dotted and hardcovered. It's apparently great for bullet journaling, which I always try to start but end up just scribbling things in my usual way. And I'm very picky about pens: The Uni-ball Vision Elite has been my go-to for a decade now.

My house is mostly pretty low-tech… no microwave, television, or sound system. If it weren't for my Bluetooth-enabled smart lightbulb, you might be able to enter my flat and imagine yourself in a different decade entirely 🙂

And what software?

I talk a lot about privacy and occasionally teach people how to use privacy-enhancing technologies, so I'm pretty attached to Tor for safer browsing, KeePassX for secure password storage, and Signal and Wire for communications… Wire in particular is so much fun – there's one friend with whom I play tic-tac-toe pretty frequently with the doodle feature.

I travel a lot, so staying organized is really key – I use Bear for on-the-go writing and note-taking, TripIt Pro for keeping my travel details in one place, and I sync up necessary documents with iCloud.

I've spent a lot of the past couple of years writing music, and have to give some love to GarageBand… I find most of Apple's default software pretty useless, but for an amateur composer with a background in music theory and performance, this is a beautiful piece of software.

What would be your dream setup?

Ooooh – Is it weird that the first item that I think about in my dream setup is the table? I want a huge, handcrafted wooden table in a sunny, window-filled room, with lots of plants (that someone else is in charge of keeping alive) and some sort of fantastic built-in surround sound.

I could (and probably should) integrate some ergonomics into the situation – a better chair, a keyboard to stave off the carpal tunnel, perhaps even a mouse. I don't know why, but these feel like luxury items.

But the pièce de résistance would be the teleportation device tucked into the corner that would allow me to meet with anyone whenever I want… and would allow me to avoid flying forevermore!


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Michael McMaster


Michael McMaster

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Michael McMaster, and at the moment I do a few things. I make videogames with House House, a very small studio that I co-direct – last year we released a game called Push Me Pull You and we recently announced our second project, which is called Untitled Goose Game for the time being.

I'm also working on a PhD, which I started this year at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, where I'm researching the position of videogames within art and design museums. I also work on-and-off as a sessional tutor at RMIT, where I teach game design practice to undergraduate students.

That sounds like too many things, when I write it out like this, and it probably is.

What hardware do you use?

For my game development work, I have a big heavy PC that I put together a long time ago, with two monitors raised up to eye level on big books. I have a Microsoft Sculpt ergonomic keyboard that I ought to use, but its wireless receiver drops in and out a lot so right now I'm typing on a very plain Logitech keyboard. My mouse looks like a plain matte-black mouse, and it's very nice to use, but it is unfortunately called a Razer DeathAdder. I sometimes draw using an Intuos Pro Medium. My desk is usually cluttered with game controllers – right now there are two DualShock 4's and an Xbox 360 controller.

For my research, I use a 2015 MacBook Pro, and a pair of Urbanears Zinken headphones. Lately I've started doing some audio interviews, too, so I bought a Sony ICD-PX470 digital voice recorder, though I always end up doing a backup recording on my phone (a Nexus 5X) because I'm paranoid of the voice recorder failing and wasting my subjects' time.

And what software?

Our current videogame is being developed in Unity, and though I've never felt all that comfortable using it, I'm learning slowly (much slower than the others on our team, who are very patient and nice about it). My main contributions to the game are asset production, art direction, and graphic design: I use Blender for 3D modelling, Photoshop for concept art and various sketches, and Illustrator for mocking up things like UI elements. Blender is a very strange program in a bunch of ways but I've been using it for years and I really like it. Although the four of us work in the same office, we all keep different work hours, so we use Slack a lot to communicate when we're not in the one room.

My research is done across a heap of Google Docs and a lot of notes in Google Keep – I think a lot about switching to something more fully-featured and useful for long-term projects, like Scrivener, but this is what works for me at the moment. I also use a Chrome plugin called Strict Workflow that acts as a pomodoro timer, and blocks out sites like Twitter and Slack for 25-minute periods so that I can focus on work (I struggle a lot with distractions, so this helps a lot).

What would be your dream setup?

It depends how dreamy I'm allowed to get! I have three desks – one at home, one at university, and one at my studio's office – and a lot of the time I feel like most of my life is spent moving in vectors between these three spaces. I'd really love two rooms right next to each other – one with all my research books and a clean desk, and another with all my game development equipment – so that I could switch between work modes more easily. Also, a big lazy dog that follows me between the rooms and sits with me while I work. And a standing desk, I guess.


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