Kate Stark


Kate Stark

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Kate Stark and I am a Twitch Partner and full-time broadcaster at twitch.tv/kate.

What hardware do you use?

I use a LOT of hardware for my job. I'm currently using a two PC setup – one for streaming and encoding and a second for gaming. I've just built a new dedicated gaming PC, and it's an absolute beast, which is what I need to be able to stream at 1080p and play games at a high graphics setting. That includes an AMD Ryzen 7 1700 processor and a ZOTAC 1080 graphics card.

For streaming console games I'm using a Magewell Capture Card, which has been incredible for streaming games off the Nintendo Switch.

As far as lighting goes, I've got an 18 inch ring light mounted behind my Logitech C920 webcam that provides great even lighting on my face, and then 2 separate LED panels mounted to provide fill light on my green screen.

I find headphones to be really important as well. It's not something that people generally think about, but for a long time the headphones I was using were causing headaches. Since I switched to the Steelseries Arctis 5's that hasn't been an issue, because of the elastic strap they have which alleviates the pressure on the top of your head.

Beyond that, I find a good chair with decent lumbar support to be super important, as well as having monitors mounted at eye level to reduce neck strain. You really don't notice how much strain you're putting on your body until you've streamed for 8+ hours and you're sore the next day.

And what software?

Streaming software is pretty simple. I use Open Broadcast Software, AKA OBS. It's basic and easy to use but it does exactly what I need it to.

For music I tend to use Spotify. I've also been using Pretzel Rocks recently for royalty-free music to avoid muting on my VODs and avoiding content-ID claims.

My backend alert system is run through Layer One. It was developed by a team of people who work with streamers and know their needs. They're really open to listening to feedback and I find they really take it to heart, and the service is constantly improving. It's totally replaced the need to use other third-party alert websites by having all the information I need in one place.

What would be your dream setup?

My dream set up is basically exactly what I have right now. In September 2016, streaming became my full-time job and since then I've found it very important to spend money on good equipment dedicated to improving the quality of my stream, because I want viewers to have the best possible quality and experience when watching.



Source link

Erin Kissane


Erin Kissane

Who are you, and what do you do?

I'm Erin Kissane. I'm a writer and editor who lives inside the tech ecosystem, kind of like the clownfish that live in anemones. I edit Source, an online magazine/community site for OpenNews, which is a nonprofit that supports open code and open process in newsrooms. I also edit books, and I've written one, so far. I recently moved from NYC to the woods.

What hardware do you use?

I use Apple laptops that are light enough for me to carry around easily, the same Logitech trackball I've had for 15 years, and a big bright high-res monitor because of eyestrain. I use the smallest viable iPhone at any given point, and lots of interchangeable pairs of low-end Sony earbuds. At night I plug in one in one ear and set the Audible app to read comforting dull books to me, which prevents my brain from freaking itself out so I can fall asleep.

My desk is a glossy IKEA thing my partner fitted with a wooden keyboard tray. It replaced a cast-iron 1914 Singer sewing table that was completely terrible and that I loved. The new one is much better.

Other good machines: Until this fall I had never had my own washing machine and dryer, they are seriously underappreciated, oh my god.

We live near a major faultline and in a place where the power goes off a lot, so we have water storage barrels, a camp stove, and a bunch of easy food stashed in the garage. Also manual coffee grinders, because I intend to live.

I use a fountain pen with a slightly bent nib, and no one but me can get it to write, which is my favorite kind of security. I carry tiny Swiss Army knives, which also have the best splinter-removing tweezers built in, but I have never used the toothpick. The big knives live in the kitchen, and I have opinions about them, but the metal object I'm really into right now is a 36" ripping bar.

And what software?

Back when you originally asked me to do this, I was really psyched about some software and mostly now I don't care. I'm writing this in Byword, and I write a lot on paper. Long things go in Scrivener, heavy research in Zotero. Google Docs for collaborative editing, Pandoc for format-juggling. It's all pretty clunky. I track Source editorial in GitHub and we also use it to make our household work. I use public library databases a lot, especially for medical and historical research. Some of them offer excellent access from home with a library card.

Clue is a good app for tracking menstrual cycles. I don't use a basal temp thermometer anymore but I highly recommend one to anyone who has a.) menstrual cycles and b.) imperfect mental or physical health, because they help establish patterns in things like pain and anxiety levels as they relate to hormonal change.

There are no music or mapping apps that don't make me want to throw my devices into the fire, everything is overfitted and terrible.

I'm cold all the time so I wear a lot of merino wool stuff and I am super into having a heated mattress pad and wool blankets.

I travel in merino and Arc'teryx super-light quick-dry technical clothing and just wash things in the sink, so I have almost nothing to carry. (This is the geekiest thing left in my life.) Extratuf boots are great for the climate I live in, which is technically a kind of rainforest.

Our medicine cabinet has fever reducers and asthma medications that are basically magic. This is all amazing. I have a few dozen herbal potions to deal with all the things that don't work well in my body, and that's a constant process of tweaking, but I'm many times healthier than I was 15 or 20 years ago, so something is working.

What would be your dream setup?

Sticking to technology, I want a sauna, an internet that isn't destroying democracy and society, and a cure for pain.


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Zach Gage


Zach Gage

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Zach Gage, I make videogames and art.

What hardware do you use?

I actually just did a total overhaul on my extremely-aged digital setup a few months ago so it's all probably a little boring — I use a 13" 2017 MacBook Pro, a 5K LG UltraFine display. I prop my MacBook up on an old IndieBox box. I keep cool with a Vornado Zippi fan which was harvested from a friend's company when they moved offices. It sounds exactly like a physical hard-drive reading and writing a ton of data when it's on. I also have an old Vew-Do balance board for keeping me focused on long calls.

I work at a standing desk that is built out of a desk my dad made a long time ago with some MultiTable legs on it. I use a Drobo 5N2 for backup.

I use a Magic Mouse 2 and a Apple extended keyboard (wired).

And what software?

I develop my games with Unity, Visual Studio, Dash, and obviously Xcode.

For the art and web stuff I use Adobe Creative Cloud (mostly Photoshop and Illustrator. Sometimes Dreamweaver and InDesign) and Glyphs (in most of my games I use fonts as my sprite-sheets so I can use Text Mesh Pro to handle their scaling).

For day to day FTP stuff I use Transmit and sometimes Coda.

For font management (super important!) I use FontExplorer X.

For building sound effects I use Logic Pro X.

For trailers, Final Cut Pro X.

Direct Mail is a lifesaver for sending out big press blasts.

I spend a lot of time on Slack to keep my sanity while working alone in my apartment. Also Tweetbot helps there.

I keep all my to-do lists in TextEdit.

Backblaze has saved my bacon once or twice.

ColorSnapper 2 is so handy for matching colors when moving between Unity and the Adobe products.

And Fantastical 2 keeps my schedule organized!

What would be your dream setup?

I wish my NAS could run Plex adequately, I had an external thunderbolt GPU for my laptop, and someone would come over with a magic box that would compile my Xcode builds faster.


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Jaiden Mispy


Jaiden Mispy

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Jaiden Mispy! I'm the lead developer for Our World in Data, a project at the University of Oxford which explores the quantitative side of human history. We cover many different subjects, especially big global changes like child mortality rates, population growth or life expectancy.

My role is to make the work of our research team easier by automating tasks for them wherever possible. Having your main users also be your coworkers is a satisfying position to be in as a programmer, and everyone is super nice to me! I'd love to see more of these tech-academia collaborations happen.

From day to day, I'm usually working on the code for our visualization tool owid-grapher, which we use for exploring the data and creating embeddable interactive charts like this. This system has grown pretty big: we have some 23,000 variables in the database, aggregated from a whole bunch of different public datasets.

The data we see is often surprisingly positive and my worldview has become much more optimistic over the course of this job. Of course, the world also faces vast new challenges like carbon emissions, so we cannot be complacent. I encourage thinking of humanity's past progress as motivation to push forward– it is now conceivably within our power to eliminate poverty and disease entirely.

In the past I've worked on a few other projects, most notably the preprint peer review site SciRate, and my Ruby twitterbot framework twitter_ebooks.

What hardware do you use?

My work computer is a 2016 MacBook Pro, the first piece of Apple tech I've ever owned! I like that I can install most webdev stuff natively using Homebrew and don't need to fuss with VMs as much anymore. Not sure if it is worth the huuuge price tag though: it's my most expensive physical possession by far.

I usually work from home with the MacBook connected to an Asus external monitor, a Razer mechanical keyboard (nice clicky sounds!), and a cheap Microsoft mouse. The new Macbooks do need a lot of USB-C adapters to connect external hardware: I use a HyperDrive Hub.

I also have an older Windows 10 PC I use for gaming and testing things in Internet Explorer or Edge. It bluescreens a lot so I should really replace it one of these days…

And what software?

I write a lot of TypeScript using Visual Studio Code, both tools I discovered earlier this year and really love. I can't imagine how I ever lived without type-based editor autocompletion. It works best in TypeScript, but even if you're writing plain JavaScript, VSCode makes a valiant effort at it by automatically downloading type declarations for libraries when they're available.

I've gone through a lot of different frameworks and libraries– my particular favorites right now are MobX and Preact. These both solve very broad, abstract problems. Mobx lets me do reactive data processing, e.g. parsing a CSV file and transforming it based on some options into JSON. Preact takes the output of that and efficiently updates the SVG in our visualizations using the new data. They're excellent building blocks for frontend development.

I'm a big fan of Netlify and would host everything there if I could. Static sites on Netlify are fast, scalable, and need very little security or maintenance work. It's great!

When I absolutely need a server, I fall back to DigitalOcean droplets running Ubuntu and use a Cloudflare CDN caching layer to minimize the risks involved. This is how ourworldindata.org currently works: a small backend server and then a lot of s-maxage headers to offload most requests to Cloudflare.

Since the OWID team is distributed around the world, we use Slack for general communication and Basecamp for organizing tasks. I recently discovered that you can integrate DigitalOcean's monitoring alerts with Slack to get messages about problems like excessive CPU consumption, which is handy!

My life is deeply entwined with Twitter, for better or worse. The bird website is how I found my current job, my wonderful boyfriend, and many of the people I'm closest to. My main client is TweetDeck and I use lots of different accounts, lists, mutes and search filters to extract happiness from the chaos.

What would be your dream setup?

Owning one of every device with every major browser for testing would be nice…

More realistically, I'd love to have an iPad Pro or a similar tablet I can easily do little sketches and mockups with. My art and design skills aren't anywhere near as good as my programming, and it'd be great to practice more of that side of things.

As for software, my "dream setup" is really just a question of making everything I want to make. I'd love for all of ourworldindata.org to be a statically generated PWA universal Preact site hosted on Netlify which lets you do fine-grained filtering of a full annotated database by topic and region with beautiful responsive variable-height interactive visualizations… maybe one day!


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Courtney Stanton


Courtney Stanton

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Courtney Stanton, and I'm a member of Feel Train, a creative technology cooperative. I volunteer at Stream PDX, a recording and podcast studio. That's where I record the weekly podcast, JoJo's Bizarre Explainer, where I talk about the manga and anime JoJo's Bizarre Adventure with Darius Kazemi and Eliz Simins. Because I work from home, I've taken to alternating working out in my apartment while watching television with running around the park a block from said apartment. I also read a fair amount every day.

What hardware do you use?

Oh gosh, this is where I'll begin to disappoint you, reader, because I super don't care about computer hardware. I'm writing this on… some kind of… PC tower? I grew up in a Cult of Perfectionism about a lot of things and I finally wrote myself one big blank check of "it's okay if it's good enough" and I've been free ever since, and unfortunately for y'all, "hardware specs" appear to fall under this umbrella. There is apparently a CyberPower PC keyboard involved, because I can read the logo. I assume it's also a CyberPower PC mouse because the logomark matches. Oh hey, it's the same logomark on the tower too, there we go, mystery solved. My husband picked this computer out and he felt very passionately about the keyboard and mouse being wired instead of wireless so that's some more information for you. He also cares a lot about how clacky the keyboard keys are. I couldn't give a fuck.

I performed the correct rites and rituals to access this information from the Tower, and it tells me there are 48GB of RAM within it, and it has an Intel Core i7-6700K CPU @ 4.00GHz processor. I hope we all feel good about that, I'm sure the computer does.

I also have a laptop but it lost the ability to charge itself a month ago and I haven't gotten around to taking it in to get fixed yet. Said laptop is a Lenovo ThinkPad, which are secretly really wonderful machines IMHO.

My desk is a vintage tank desk I bought second-hand, and my desk chair is a rather fancy home office chair that we got for free years ago when some friends who have a startup ran afoul of the City of Boston's fire codes for business furnishings. (All office furniture has to be treated with flame retardant chemicals that home furnishings don't have on them — who knew! Free Aeron chair for us.)

For podcast recording, the Stream PDX studio is itself a piece of hardware full of hardware — a vintage Airstream trailer turned recording studio with 4 Sennheiser e 835-S, studio headphones, and a Zoom R16 multitrack recorder. I do podcast episode planning in a notebook that was a piece of speaker swag at a conference (I think?)… I honestly have no idea where this thing came from. It's a blank notebook and it's an odd size.

For the working out in front of my TV, I use this weight bench and these weights. (I tried to buy weights and a bench off Craigslist, but somehow everyone thinks their weight bench that's coming out of their garage is mint and worth the same price as a new one. Also those weights are incredible and take up basically no room, which is what I need for a small apartment.) I've got this TV because I'm a silly big TV person, and either you're one of those people or you aren't, and you probably already know that about yourself and have that sorted in your own home. I track my workouts in a little Field Notes graph notebook and I use a Uniball Vision Needle micro pen (I guess… we have the most of that one in the drawer so that's what I end up grabbing). For the running around in a park, I've just started using these shoes and have had great results (read: faster times), so do with that what you will. I use PowerBeats wireless headphones when running because reviews said they had better bass than most models and I listen to a lot of hip hop when I run. The larger "lifted weights/ran/lifted weights/ran/rested" calendar tracking happens on a wall calendar that hangs in our home office.

I do almost all of my reading on my 4-year-old iPad Air and the rest happens on my iPhone 6 Plus, neither of which I plan to replace any time soon. (I feel the same way about computer hardware as I do about cars and other depreciating assets: buy outright and use until total failure.)

And what software?

This PC tower I'm on is running Windows 10 Home, which I jumped to from Windows 7. The only thing I regret about the move is that I can no longer play The Sims Medieval, which was an incredibly weird, underrated game. Like all good product-humans, I use a variety of Google services (Drive, Mail, Docs, Sheets, Calendar), with Boomerang added onto Gmail so I can actually keep track of correspondence and follow up with people (and just archive everything so it's out of the way). I also use GitHub paired up with ZenHub to manage the main Open Source project our company is working on right now. I cannot say enough good things about ZenHub — it essentially fixes Github and makes it usable for people other than programmers.

I use Spotify both at my desk and while running (and while running I pair it with Runkeeper). I use the default Apple Podcasts app/Netflix/Hulu/Amazon in a roulette fashion to find something to keep my attention while weight lifting, because counting to 10 gets dull fast.

What would be your dream setup?

I don't really have a lot of "gear" fantasies. My biggest dream setup is probably Universal Basic Income at this point, and/or health insurance that covered transgender healthcare. That sort of thing would help my work out a lot more materially than if someone released Yet Another To-Do List App. That said…

For 2018 I'm planning on using a Hobonichi Techo planner to consolidate my various scheduling/tracking/planning activities (both the stuff I've mentioned here and all the stuff I haven't), and that's a tiny dream come true right there.

I also eagerly await the day Apple actually gets the Watch to the place where it's a real Dick Tracy Wrist Phone. At that point, I think my ideal computer hardware setup will be Apple Watch, iPad Pro, PC Tower. I don't actually like being "bothered" by apps or using them when I have idle time very often — I'm a "default to no notifications" person, I don't need a lot of apps on my phone, etc. But I do want to be reliably available, so the idea of having a sort of hybrid pager-phone on my wrist that lets me make calls when I need to (and go running without a damn phablet strapped to my upper arm), is incredibly appealing to me. Then the super-iPad for all the things I currently use my laptop for (and traveling a few pounds lighter), and the PC honestly just for videogames. (I'm struggling to think of work applications for a mouse and keyboard… I suppose I do still have times when it's easier and faster, when working in giant spreadsheets for hours. So occasionally that.)


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Frances Berriman


Frances Berriman

Who are you, and what do you do?

I'm Frances Berriman. I'm a British designer, developer and artist living in San Francisco. I do a variety of things, including freelance product design consultancy and front-end development but most notably I have tended to work on public sector technology projects. For example, I worked on the award-winning re-design of GOV.UK for the UK Government Digital Service and later worked with Code for America.

These days, I am focusing more of my time on my other interests — IoT and Smart Homes, via my site Sensors and Sensibility, and illustration and fine arts painting.

What hardware do you use?

I use a 2013 13" MacBook Pro for development and design work and this is the device I travel with, but I also use a Chromebook Pixel for just general browsing or writing at home. I recently got an iPad Pro v2 10" and Apple Pencil, but I'm still warming up to that for art. My current phone is a Google Pixel v1 and I'm sticking with that because the new version has no headphone jack for my must-have Bose QuietComfort 20s. I also love my Pebble Time Round and wear it constantly, as I prefer to get alerts to that rather than pulling my phone out every other minute. For similar phone-avoiding reasons, I also like to have a Kindle to hand for reading and currently use the Kindle Voyage. I also carry this adorable cheero PowerPlus Nyanboard Nyanbo battery.

On the art side, I work in oil paint, watercolour and gouache, and I cart everything around in a Fjallraven Foldsack No.1 in copper green.

And what software?

I spend a large amount of my time inside Chrome, so my OS generally doesn't matter hugely, however I absolutely hate the OSX Dock and hide it completely on my Mac. Instead, I get around my machine using Alfred and Terminal. Google Calendar and Gmail (with very heavy filters and labels) rule my days, and I've been experimenting with using Todoist now it has GCal integration. When I've wanted real power-tools for todo lists, though, nothing has beaten GQueues.

For code, I use Sublime Text, but honestly it could be Notepad for all I use the advanced features, and I've been playing with Glitch lately for fun little personal projects. On the design side, I prefer to actually just knock-up actual websites to show wireframes, so I'd be lost without Chrome DevTools.

I have Spotify on every platform, and prefer just throwing on a Daily Mix and seeing what comes up.

What would be your dream setup?

I can work pretty much anywhere and on any hardware, so I don't have a dream in those terms but if I could pick an aesthetic for my ideal live/work location, it would probably look something like Ferris Bueller's-best-friend Cameron's house or the Blueshore ELC building used as a filming location in Legion — all glass walls and wood in a beautiful natural environment. I work best with lots of natural light and a very controllable environment in terms of sound and temperature and I like to be in a space that responds automatically to my needs – it's probably why I'm drawn to smart home technology. I'm pretty happy with my setup today, though, and I couldn't really ask for much more.

Maybe a teleporter to more easily pop back to London?


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Jack Chen


Jack Chen

Who are you, and what do you do?

Hey! My name is Jack Chen, but I'm mostly known as 'chendo' on and off the internet. I love solving problems, building products, and working with technology.

I build things at Ferocia, currently building a new digital-first banking experience named Alt. Before that, I was the CTO of a telemedicine startup, and built the cloud backend for connected lighting at LIFX.

For fun, I like to build things, go fast in go karts, and play video games. My usual creative outlet is photography.

Some of the things I've made that you may have encountered:

I have a keen interest in human-machine interfaces and am especially looking forward to thought-based control when they become a thing (and iron out security issues!).

What hardware do you use?

My primary machine is a 15" MacBook Pro with the controversial TouchBar. I kind of like it, but it desperately needs haptic feedback.

I always have my iPhone 6s with me, and I usually wear my Apple Watch S0 assuming I don't forget to charge it the night before.

At work, I use a LG UltraFine 5K display with my MacBook Pro open. Sound isolation is provided by a pair of Bose QC35s.

For desktop gaming, I went a little overboard and put together a i7 6700k, 32GB RAM, GTX 1080, a bunch of SSDs encased in Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX with tempered glass sides. I have a Logitech G910 keyboard (which I'm kinda meh about) and a SteelSeries Rival 310 for input devices. My headset is a SteelSeries Arctis 7.

I have a Nintendo Switch, Xbox One S and Steam Link for living room gaming.

I enjoy toying with home automation. I use LIFX lights for general lighting and basic information emitters. I have the Hello Sense for sleep tracking and environmental sensors, and I reverse-engineered their API to push sensor data into Datadog for monitoring and dashboards. I have a Google Home for voice control, but find the grammar for light control rather limiting.

For energy monitoring, I have a Smappee energy monitor, and I push this data into Datadog for monitoring to have alerts set up for abnormal sustained usage.

Data is stored on a Synology DS2415+ with mostly WD Red drives, with an SSD cache. Routing of 100/40mbit internet is done by an ASUS RT-AC68U running AdvancedTomato for improved bandwidth limiting and QoS, with bandwidth and latency data pushed into Datadog for monitoring.

I recently picked up a Sony a7r ii as an upgrade to my old Panasonic GH2 and absolutely love it. I also have a GoPro HERO5 Black for go karting and occasional snowboarding.

And what software?

The basics:

Development tools:

I use BetterTouchTool to set my heavily-used global shortcuts for my most commonly used apps for idempotent shortcuts that require minimal cognitive overhead. Usage stats show I average about 500 invocations on the average work day!

For photography, I used to use Aperture but am experimenting with Picktorial.

What would be your dream setup?

If we somehow ended up in a world where human-machine interfaces were secure, I'd love to have bionic eyeballs, the ability to naturally invoke mental commands, external memory storage, a thought augmentation engine and my own AI agent — kind of like Clippy, but less annoying.

Otherwise, I guess I'd settle for unobtrusive high-resolution augmented reality glasses that cover my entire vision with built-in eye tracking. It would run an intent-centric shell of my own design. If safe thought control was viable, I'd use that. If not, positional input would be through eye tracking, and high bandwidth input would be a chorded split keyboard if I was able to learn to use that at an effective speed.

I'd be sitting in some sort of zero gravity chair for minimal stress on the body. Ideally though, I'd love to be able to upload myself to the internet so I can be everywhere and live forever!


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Ashley Baxter


Ashley Baxter

Who are you, and what do you do?

I'm Ashley, founder of With Jack. I'm building a platform that makes insurance more affordable and accessible for freelancers. With Jack is laser-focused on freelancers, so the idea is that you're never asked questions that aren't relevant to the work you do and you get the exact insurance you need. Instead of filling out a traditional proposal form, you'll have a chat with Jack. I'm building this from an office in Glasgow, Scotland which is a converted shipyard.

When I'm not building With Jack, I'm playing video games (currently Horizon Zero Dawn), taking photos and sharing them on Instagram. A lot of my hobbies are screen-based, so I make sure I take plenty of walks with my dog, Indie, in the Scottish landscape.

What hardware do you use?

I'm using a 2015, 13" Retina MacBook Pro as my main machine. I'm doing a lot of traveling at the moment as I'm going through an accelerator programme, so this comes everywhere with me. In the office I have a 21" iMac, which could probably do with being upgraded. It's a little slow — especially when editing RAW files.

I'm using a Canon 5D MK IV for photos. My house was broken into this year, so I bought this camera with the insurance payout. It's a dream. It's mostly accompanied by a 50mm ƒ1.4 lens. This is a really nice set-up and what I use to take most of my photos. I've also started making videos for YouTube, so a wider lens like the 24mm ƒ1.4 is great for that.

My favourite gadget right now is my FitBit Surge. Spending a lot of time at a screen, I like to hit 10,000 steps a day and workout 4 times a week. I like tracking all of this stuff with my FitBit and getting a weekly email of my activity.

And what software?

For my insurance business, I use Pipedrive to track my sales funnel, ConvertKit to communicate with customers, and Zapier to automate a few tasks.

Customer development is really important to me. I want to know my customer. Iterate is a new app I've been using to get feedback on what I'm building.

I delegate most of the development because I'm only slightly technical, but when I do code I use Sublime Text.

Photography-wise, my software needs are pretty lightweight. I use Lightroom to manage and edit my photos.

I'm bootstrapping my business, so I try to keep my software set-up pretty lean!

What would be your dream setup?

I'd definitely upgrade my iPhone 6 to the iPhone X. I'd also like to get a quality photo printer. Lots of my photos are uploaded to Instagram and then forgotten about. It would be nice to have a quality printer at phone.

Even though I have an office which I love (and can take my dog to work!), I do also like to work from home. I'd love for my home office to have more light and space, and even an extra desk to have friends come over and collaborate. My home office looks into a car park, which isn't very inspiring. My dream set-up would have a view of a park or nature of some sort. I'd have an espresso machine in the corner, so there's always the aroma of fresh coffee.


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link

Patrick Ewing


Patrick Ewing

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Patrick Ewing, and I'm a narrative game designer, Twitter Eng veteran and recovering Ruby programmer.

I helped make Firewatch along with the good citizens of Campo Santo, and I'm currently making a game about the future of cities, AI, and emotional survival. You play as a Lyft/Uber driver struggling to stay alive on her star rating, as autonomous cars take over the streets. It will be very difficult, and at times sad, but also very funny, I hope.

What hardware do you use?

For the bulk of my development, I'm using a custom-built PC: Intel i7 CPU, two GTX 1080ti GPUs that are SLI'd together, yadda yadda yadda. I built it just after Firewatch shipped, when I thought making an adventure game in VR might be a good idea. I quickly decided against this, and it's now way-overpowered for the kind of game we're building instead.

I use two 4K displays from LG, a Das Keyboard with Cherry MX switches with some lovely "trans colored" pink and blue pastel key-caps, and some cheesy wireless gaming mouse I wouldn't recommend to anybody. I'm using a Jarvis adjustable-height standing desk and a Focal mono-pod stool for when standing gets old.

And what software?

I'm using Windows 10, because Video Games. Not a day goes by that I don't curse this life that I've chosen. It's an inferior OS in almost every way that I use because Apple doesn't ship computers with modern GPUs.

My team (we're called Chance Agency) uses Slack for all our creative coordination, and appear.in for video conferencing.

We're building out game in Unity 2017, using ink as our narrative scripting language and Spine for our animated characters. I write code in Visual Studio, VS Code and Sublime Text, depending on what language I'm in. Git with Git LFS for version control.

What would be your dream setup?

My dream setup would be a collaborative physical computing environment, something like Dynamicland that worked remotely. I was to lay code components out on a table and see my coworkers physically rearrange them to make new connections. I want our version control to be incorporated into the 3D game environment. I want to set up a scene by manipulating game objects with my hands, like Timoni's amazing Unity VR demos.

This is a little more far-fetched, but I'd also love a Mac laptop that can run 3D games at 60fps.


Thanks for reading! If you’re enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil’ site independent for as little as $1 a month!



Source link